Politics in Turkey

Politics in Turkey is very different that I’m used to in Belgium or even Western Europe. And if for one thing being active in a European Political Federation is that is very informative about the sense of politics. Politics as in political parties. Politics as in a parliamentary democracy. Politics between right- and left-wing policies.

And in those things politics in Turkey is very different. In every sense.

It might be very strange to understand for anybody who is used to any kind of Western European kind of politics but it is so. I only hope that by writing this down I don’t seem too much like a spoiled Western European brat who knows things so much better. A kinder manner of neo-imperialism.

But things in Turkey are very different indeed. For one there seems to be no such thing as a difference between political parties. All of them seem to be very nationalistic minded, militaristic and conservative. There seems to be no such thing as a difference as in conservatives, liberals, socialists and progressives.
If there’s any difference then that should be that between black and white. There is no such thing as a grey area of politics. You’re either in favor or against. No middle way at all. And in such extremist surroundings it doesn’t even make sense to be grey. Not at all. No sense at all. Because that only confuses. And confusion in the field of politics, or for whatever else that matters is just not done in Turkish society.

This black or white thinking also makes it impossible to ever think about a parliamentary democracy. The closure of any Kurdish party (the only worthy opposition party possible) has shown this. Seven Kurdish parties have been closed down this way. Because they were against a majority thinking Because they were against a Turkish nationalistic approach. Because they defended a minority (maybe only the biggest minority in the Turkish Republic, but still). And this is unsettling in what should be considered a democracy. This is actually not even worth to be called a democracy when parties that stand up for minority rights are abolished just because of that. And all other reasons given are just crap.

Also the complete lack of something that could be considered a a left-wing party in the Turkish Republic is completely strange. Because no matter how progressive a party may seem here, it is always overshadowed by nationalism, by militarism or by clear racism. There is as such no such thing as critical thinking. And that is something that is needed to be left-wing, to be progressive. To be able to change.

And therefor I fear that this way of politics, that has drowned society, or that is maybe a result of the societies wishes, maybe never really ready for democracy. Or even the illusion of democracy. Because democracy as such takes courage to think differently. To be in acceptance of minimal change.

2 responses to “Politics in Turkey

  1. The reason of disbandment of the party is clearly not because of their naive support to Kurdish society, which would actually be the best thing to do for them. But it’s because of the organic connection to the terrorist group.

    I hope you become at least more open to the facts and discuss something in more detail rather than imposing your sweet “European democracy”.

    • Hm. I think if you come to that conclusion you have been reading a bit too much mainstream media. The connection that the judiciary system is making between the DTP and the PKK is only set on speeches some DTP’ers have delivered in witch they have backed up some of Abdullah Ocalan’s plans for peace and democracy in TR. Of course one can say that that is stupid since Ocalan is a convicted terrorist. But he’s at the same time also a huge symbol for a large part of the Kurdish population as he was the first one to actually fight against the oppression and fight for freedom.

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